A second short story about the Camino de Santiago pilgrimage.

My current part of the Camino de Santiago pilgrimage ends in Burgos, Spain. I’ve had many grand human encounters along the way. I recommend attempting the trek just for this reason. Talking to people from every conceivable part of the world, and listening to their stories, reaffirms your faith in the human condition. And after all, isn’t that what it’s really all about.

I confess, I’m stopping at this current point due to an extreme apathy. I just don’t know why I’m really doing it or what I thought I was going to get out of it. Even in this short run, I’m absolutely sure that I got more than I thought I would. There’s a truth in walking that you find along the way.

(A half-dozen other pilgrims waiting on a train out of Burgos. Doing a section of the Camino is quite fashionable.)

Now, In all practicality, I made a bunch of miss-steps. I hadn’t planned on the trails being what they were. When the guide books showed nice smooth gravel paths they were being overly kind. There are large section (especially downhill) where the trails is a loose scree of sharp gravel rock more akin to a outback mountain trail. The section of old Román road is particularly daunting! The percentage of paved path is optimistically high, and mainly applies to through-town section. The trail is legit.

I came equipped with a pair of Columbia walking shoes/trekking shoes. These were not the right choice. With the sharp gravel, you want something with a sturdy sole on it. Otherwise, the rocks start to push through, which they did. Also, I literally started to walk the stitching out of them. Tip …. don’t short your footwear!

My next major miss-step was weight. My pack was much too heavy for an extended excursion like the Camino. You definitely want your weight at the absolute minimum. I need to cut my weight by a good 5 pounds or more. That being said, I saw many people suffering along with packs obviously heavier than mine. I wish them Buen Camino!

On this baggage front, there are numerous companies that will transport your bags from town to town. And many pilgrims utilize this service. This seems (to me) missing the point of the Camino. If you want a leisurely walk through the country, there are other numerous options in both Europe and America. That’s just my opinion.

So, I sit at the train station. Sore feet on both sides. Right foot tore up from wearing my Tevas instead of my shoes. Left foot tore up from a blister in the middle of the ball of my foot (which I walked on for several days). My shoulder bones are sore from the pack (not the muscle, the bones), and I am running on low ambition.

Safe to say, I have learned a great deal about what not to do. These lessons were hard won, and won’t be dismissed any time soon.

I don’t think the Camino is done with me yet? I had trouble not putting my pack on and walking this morning. Still, I plan on waiting out any further attempt until I have better feet to carry me.

Lesson. Know when to concede. There is no shame in stopping. There is shame in injuring yourself being stupid. As I have said before; if James had of found a horse, he would have rode it!

Peace. Out.

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A couple days into the Camino de Santiago Pilgrimage.

Since I came up with the idea of becoming a pilgrim, and maybe finding out something new about myself in the process, the idea of the Camino de Santiago Pilgrimage has changed and shifted in my mind. A simple walk across Spain, to potentially learn/experience something new. A chance to . . . Encounter faith. A way to experience new people and points of view. Exercise.

Where I have found every one of those things over the previous days, I have also learned some things about the Camino itself. Trust me when I say, the undertaking isn’t what you think it is.

(The parapet wall behind the cathedral in Pamplona. Tye architecture of the city is still amazing.)

If all you’ve seen about the undertaking has come from YouTube, I can say that’s those portrayals are all pretty accurate. They’re all a little tainted by personal opinion, as is mine, but their accurate enough.

I think the thing that’s most shocking about the whole affair is the lack of actual pilgrims. There are a lot of people walking along a path that is surprisingly well marked and vendor-laden, but I don’t think any of them are out looking for much more than a stamp in a booklet and a bed for the night.

(A realistic picture of the modern pilgrimage.)

To be fair, I’m one of those people. I’m not overflowing with spirituality. I assume this is because I understand too much about people and their motivations. Still, an actual pilgrim, now and again, that would add so much more to the experience.

The initial days under foot have all been ones of decision. The decision: to continue this craziness or stop and go to the beach? Everyday I quit. I’m going no farther. This was a bad idea. And everyday I end up having a conversation with someone I never expected to have which continues my persistence. I still want to quit. Right now. As I type this. But, I’ll get up in the morning and continue on toward Logroño, My pack on my sore shoulders.

(The alter area of Santa Maria, in Los Arcos. A reason, in-and-Of-itself, to walk the path.)

I may have another conversation there that will continue to push me on. I hope I do. That would be great! We’ll all just have to wait and see.

(Your pilgrim’s credential. Your access card to cheap rooms and cheap meals.)

On another note, some logistics. I flew into Pamplona from London, in Iberia. Got the one-way ticket off Expedia for a reasonable price. I stayed at the Hotel Castillo de Javier. Booked it on booking.com. It was centrally located in town, and quite accommodating, though a bit loud.

Since I stated my Camino in Pamplona, I picked up my pilgrim’s credential at the Bishop’s office next to the cathedral. It was either one or two euro. I honestly don’t remember.

More to follow, if my feet hold up.

(I don’t know what the flower is, but their everywhere along the way.)

Buen Camino!

US Road Trip 2017, Day 8.

Today consisted of walking my feet off. My goal in life today was to see the old masters. They had to be somewhere in DC. Turns out they are in DC, at the National Gallery of Art. 

Now, the Gallery opens at 11:00am, so I figured I’d head to the Smithsonian Natural History Mussum first, because it opened an hour earlier. 

I was at the Metro and headed into the city at 9:15am. The weekend work crews were no more, so I was on the Metro at the hotel drop off point and headed for the center of liberty.  

I have had a prime complaint since I have been in DC. I can’t find a Metro map that has the Metro lines and the street names where the stops are. It’s super aggravating. This being said, I overshot by two stops and had to walk back down the Mall to the Natural History Museum. 

The Smithsonian NHM is a great place. The collections are well presented and very neatly put together. My one complaint would be, with such a vast collection I would have thought they’d have more comprehensive exhibits. Nevertheless, it was a good experience. 

After a picture of the Hope Diamond, I was on my way down the street to the National Gallery of Art. This place is impressive! Impressive! I love the Old Masters, and the have the Old Masters. The have the only Da Vinci in the Western Hemisphere. The have a good amount of Rubens, Van Dyck, Botticelli, and Titian. They have two rooms of Rembrandt. Absolutely a fabulous collection. 

Not having walked enough, I decided to walk back across the Mall to the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum. I am happy I made the effort. The displays at the Museum are absolutely worth your time. They’re collections goes from The Spirit of ST Louis to Space Ship One. They have good WW II collections and good Rocket exhibits. The Apollo Gallery is outstanding. 

I took in the Dark Universe showing at the Einstein Planetarium. It was great. I enjoyed a presentation that wasn’t strictly constellations and planets. 

Leaving the Air and Space Museum right at closing time, I headed back to the Metro. The Metro, even st 5:30pm rush hour, was easily navigatable. I made my way back to Bethesda with little issue. 

Dinner and a few drinks at the hotel, and it was feet up. I’m done, son! 

More tomorrow. 


The largest nut on earth. From a coconut tree, somewhere.


The Hope Diamond. 


A Rembrandt self portrait.


The Spirit of ST Louis.