A Review Of Travel Costs From A Trip Across Europe.

Now that I’ve had a little time to decompress from the last European trip, it’s probably time to get back to the blogosphere and continue talking about the wandering around. I’m going to do this first part by a quick discussion of cost. The actual cost vs what I thought it was going to cost when I left America. It can be summed up as “Yes, I spent too much. But, I had a good time!”

The Upfront Cost.

I spent a bunch of money getting ready to take the trip. Most all of the expense proved out to be the usual.

The upfront cost included my intercontinental plane ticket from Austin to London. I chose London simply because it was the cheapest ticket I could find at the time. I purchased two Eurail Passes; both multi-day, multi-country passes. There were two passes needed based upon my initial travel plans. I bought a ticket for the 2019 Austrian Grand Prix, as I planned on attending the race. I also bought a festival ticket for Ultra Europe that was eventually tossed in the trash, as I changed travel plans along the way, but that happens.

The logistics of getting around and where to stay were all figured out on-the-fly. I work best that way. Airfare, train tickets, festival ticket, and race ticket combined cost me $2100.00. It went something like Airfare (Delta) $605.00 for roundtrip ticket, rail passes at $1,175.00, $130.00 for the festival ticket, and $190.00 (with shipping) for the race ticket. I like to remove the upfront costs from the travelling money. It allows me to reduce my daily math (am I running out of money math). Let’s look at that now.

The Travel Money.

The amount of travel money available basically came the remains of the budgeted money minus the upfront costs. I started my travel plan with $19,000.00, which was supposed to last for four months of travel. factoring out the $2,100.00 already spent, the budget planned worked out somewhat like the following.

beginning: $19,000.00

Upfront Costs: $2,100.00

40 Days walking the Camino de Santiago (40×50.00/day): $2,000.00

89 Days backpacking around Europe (89×150.00/day): $13,350.00

Buffer: $1,550.00

Obviously, this was a best-case scenario, based upon my math skills and extremely optimistic sense of humor. Now, let’s continue.

The Achilles Heel.

My optimistic plan was based upon my desire to see and do numerous things while in Europe. It was also based upon the idea that I was going to do what I said I was going to do. (If you’re an active reader of this blog then you already know my plan goes out he window. LOL!!)

The first weak link in my plan is in the planning. I planned to walk the Camino Pilgrimage at the beginning due to weather conditions and its low cost per day. I understood in doing this that, if I did not use all of the Camino days actually on the Camino, this would shorten my overall travel time. It would also mean that the cost per day would go up before I planned on it doing so.

The second weak link was in the travel path and lodging. The path laid out beyond the Camino was based upon getting to where I wanted to go with the lowest possible cost of travel. And, once there, Finding the cheapest lodging available wherever I happened to be. This plan involved extensive use of the rail passes, and limited low-cost air carriers for plane tickets. Lodging was going to be in the form of Air BNB, low budget hotels and some nights on the train. This, if used properly, would allow me to budget my money.

Truth vs Fiction.

I had a well thought-out plan, and a fist full of money. I was ready to be off on a grand adventure. Well, that was what I thought. What I really had was a adequately assembled bad idea, and enough money to get out of the country. Okay, it wasn’t as bad as all that. Let’s just say that things went off-plan.

It took about nine days for things to come apart. It took two days to travel from Austin, to London, to Madrid, to Pamplona, to start the Camino de Santiago. It took seven days of walking the Camino for me to decide that it wasn’t for me. 9 days into 60 days, and the plan had gone astray. (I don’t call this blog the I-Stray-Blog for no reason at all!) Going into the backpacking section of the trip automatically adjusted the path of the remaining section of the trip. It also shortened the total time dramatically.

The next thing that went wide was lodging. Instead of heavily utilizing Air BNB and lowest-cost budget hotels, I booked in at the lowest ‘decent’ hotel on booking.com. This slight change in decision making did a good job of increasing cost. Also, due to the change in travel path brought on by the change in schedule, more legs went from train travel to airline travel. This added unplanned airfare costs to the overall budget. (Yes, I already possessed the rail tickets.)

So, what happened? Well, I used the Austrian Grand Prix as my new end date, and dumped everything that came along afterward. Why? Mainly, I really wanted to go to the race. This changed the end date from 4 September to about 5 July.

The effect? Sixty days on the Camino and 89 days backpacking turned into 9 days on the Camino and 57 days of backpacking. One small change and a few loose money spending decisions changed the plan greatly. The real summer trip around Europe looked something like this:

Beginning: $19,000.00

Upfront Costs: $2,100.00

9 Days on the Camino (9x$50.00/day): $450.00

57 Days of backpacking (57x$231.57/day): $13,200.00

Leftover money: $1,900.00

Thoughts About The Plan.

Now, if you noticed that real per-day number and wondered WTH? So did I.

Did I have a great time? Absolutely! Did I see what I wanted to see? At all of the places I managed to go to, Yes! Was it all worth it? Hell Yes! But, did I waste a bunch of money? Well, that depends on how you define waste. The money spent does line up directly with the amount of fantastic times I had travelling, so I say that it was all money well-spent.

This math experiment did force me to consider how I travel in the future. Knowing that I spent more money per-day than I thought I would is important information. Next time, I’ll plan more money upfront. more money upfront will give more of a buffer when things go sideways. It will also allow me to stay. Because, well, I’m probably going to stray.

Following this, I’m going to get back to travel. We will talk about the trip, the stops, and the times had along the way.

Now, go. Get out there. Have great adventures!

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Readying For Europe 2019

One of my two main goals when I departed Kuwait last year was to spend the summer in Europe. The other was to write a new book (which has already been accomplished), but is unimportant to this blog post.

As with the passing of the clock hands, time has cruised by, and it’s almost time to head out for a summer of backpacking and picture taking. The plan (which is rough at best) is to start by undertaking the Camino de Santiago Pilgrimage across Spain. After that’s either accomplished or not, I’m going to be on a backpacking train/plane trip across Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Near East. I say it a little tongue-in-cheek because I’ve changed the route about a dozen times, so far. I have absolutely no doubt that it will also change while I’m doing it. The area has so many options that I’m sure I will get distracted. (Hence the title of this blog. HAHAHAHAHA!)

I’m going to start this “series” of post with some logistical information. First will be on plane tickets. I bought my intercontinental plane ticket in advance. I used Kayak.com to scan ticket prices for all airports in Europe, and purchased when I found a ticket that fit my needs. I am flying into London, England, because it was the first ticket that met my pricing requirements. From there, I’ll connect to the mainland by either train or plane.

The ticket search engines of choice for my trips are as follows: Kayak.com, Expedia.com, and Easyjet.com. I find that I like the kayak search engine, and that easyjet and expedia include the majority of low cost ticket options. I plan to use one-way plane flights to connect disparate parts of Europe, without wasting multiple days on the train. This concession to speedy travel is important, because an American tourist is only allowed 90 total days in the EU Zone within any 180 day period. To fit in maximum travel, I need to limit my wasted travel days. That’s why the internal flights are necessary.

Second is the necessity for general getting around. For this I use the train. The continent of Europe has a magnificent rail system. The different country rail systems are all interconnected, and laced together in the different rail timetables. I use EURail.com to purchase multi-country rail passes before I depart America. You’ll get a significantly better rate using a rail pass, as opposed to buying tickets one-at-a-time. I prefer trains to renting cars in Europe as it’s just more convenient. Once you’re in most European cities and towns, you really don’t need a car. I’ve used several different websites to purchase rail tickets over the years. I happen to like EURail.com best. They have good prices, a website that is easy to navigate, and an excellent mobile app to keep up with the train schedules.

Third is hotels and such. Normally I use hotels when in Europe. Mid-range hotels are realistically priced and clean. I use Booking.com for my hotel reservations planet-wide. I like the way the website is laid-out, and I find the mobile app works without issue everywhere I go. If I can book before departing, I do. With the unknown path and timing of this trip, I will be doing a lot of booking on-the-fly.

The initial part of the trip (the Camino pilgrimage) I’ll be utilizing Albergues and Pensiones, which are basically pilgrims hostels. The state-run units are first come, first served. So, it will all be a day-to-day hunt for a bed. (That should work out well.) For the city traveling that comes after that, I am going to try my hand at renting through Airbnb.com. It’s my first time utilizing them, and I’m excited to see how it turns out. If it’s a good experience I’ll definitely continue, as the prices are well-below hotel rates.

Fourth major task is packing. When going to Europe, I normally pack for a European Holiday. On this occasion, the bag will be somewhat different. With the pilgrimage planned for the beginning of my excursions, I’m packing specifically for the Camino. With the addition of a GoPro and some swim trunks, the packing list is Camino specific. When I’m done, I can change out the pack (Send home stuff I no longer need, and add stuff I find while traveling). I’ll be adding a complete list of my Camino packing in an upcoming post, as soon as I know what it’s finally going to be.

Right now, The planned country list goes something like; England, Spain (multiple stops), Holland, Germany (Multiple stops), Austria (Grand Prix weekend), Slovakia, Czech Republic, Poland (multiple stops), Croatia (Ultra Europe weekend), Greece (multiple stops), Turkey, Israel (Multiple stops), Romania (multiple stops), Hungary, Switzerland, and then back to England. I’m sure that It’ll change along the way.

That’s the current plan. The next series of post will be coming from this summer’s European and Near Eastern (Turkey, Israel, maybe Lebanon) experiences. I hope you’ll enjoy the notes-from-the-road.

The continets of my Camino backpack. It’s camino specific, at this point.

That’s the basic logistics of the beginning. It should be a crazy trip. I hope you find some useful information that you can use in your own travels. If you have any ideas/suggestions, definitely let me know in the comments.

Now get out there! Go travel somewhere.