The Wonders of Crete.

Okay, to start with this post probably should have been called the wonders of Heraklion, but Heraklion is in Crete so, there you go! Considering I had a singular vision of what Crete would be before I left, I’m super happy that I went. Crete (or the Heraklion area) is worth your travel time.

Getting my butt to Crete!

When I was planning my trip around the islands I wanted to use the ferry to go everywhere. That turned out to be way to time consuming for the time I had blocked out. I ended up flying into Santorini, but I caught the ferry from there south to Crete. Negotiating the ferry ticketing and dock area was super easy. Like hang out and drink some beers before you leave easy. The ferry from Santorini to Crete was a straight shot and lasted a couple hours.

The ferry system has well maintained vessels with plenty of amenities to occupy your time while you travel.

Understanding what time you’re actually getting into town!

Picking the one time available for the high-speed ferry on the day I wanted to leave for Crete, I didn’t really stop to ponder what time the ferry would get into the port of Heraklion. In retrospect, it might have been wise to do so beforehand.

I walked off the ferry ramp onto a poorly light and empty landing area. We were the last ferry of the day and everyone who worked there had basically gone home for the night. And, I do mean almost everybody. The guy that raised and lowered the ramp was still there, and a guy with a traffic wand directing the cars out of the area. That was about it. There was nobody at the taxi stand. There was no one at the bus stop. Everyone walking off the ferry, like I was, just disappeared out into the city darkness.

At first, a walk across a foreign city in the dark didn’t seem appealing. But with no taxis kicking around, it was a necessity. To my happiness, the walk was quiet and uneventful. I made my way from the port across town to my hotel in about 20 minutes, unbothered by the city’s nighttime traffic. Even the sketchy side streets were quiet, the people I encountered off on their own affairs.

Things to do in Heraklion.

The city is a primary entryway onto Crete, and a modern city. Even considering the city’s ancient roots, it feels much more a modern entity. But, getting out and walking around will put you in touch with it’s many pleasant wonders. Following are the things that I found interesting during my 3 days of wanderings.

The Palace of Knossos.

Palace of Knossos. Brownell. 2019

The author at the Palace of Knossos, outside Heraklion, Crete. 2019

The majority of day tripping cruise ship people know Crete for one thing. To be honest, the Palace of Knossos was the primary reason that I ventured to the island.

The Palace complex lies outside the city of Heraklion. It’s easy to get to, heavily trafficked, and impressive. Since I plan to cover it in the next post, I’ll give you a picture and move on for now.

Enjoying the street scenes in the old town.

Heraklion, Crete. Brownell. 2019

Street art on one of Heraklion’s many small side streets. 2019

The area of the city sweeping uphill from the old port is the old part of Heraklion. As with many “old towns” the area is a congestion of small streets and shops. The whole area is interspersed with statues, churches, and historical buildings. Wandering the side streets you’ll find quiet cafes and bars separated by street art and other interesting sights. Walking the many small side streets is definitely time well spent.

The old port.

The old port, Heraklion, Crete. Brownell. 2019

The old port of Heraklion with its defensive fortress guarding the entrance. 2019

One of the gems of Heraklion is the area around the old port and harbor. A collection of structures in various states of disrepair that ages from the Greeks all the way up to the Middle Ages. Old Roman dry docks on land show the old waterline of the harbor. The outer edge and breakwater give a sense for its size in antiquity.

The defensive fortress sitting about halfway out along the breakwater harkens back to the days when things weren’t as calm as they are today. The fortress’s canons have an unobstructed line of fire out into the waters of the Aegean.

The fortress is well worth both the walk out to it, and the price of admission (which is cheap enough). There are nice exhibits and a documentary film to go along with commanding views.

The Archeological Museum.

Archeological Museum, Crete. Brownell. 2019

Statuary on display at the Archeological Museum, Heraklion, Crete. 2019

As expected of anywhere in Greece, Heraklion has a well appointed archeological museum. The institution hosts a large and varied collection of objects from both Crete and surrounding islands.

Being located north of the old town area, the museum is a quick bus ride up the hill. Make your way there early, as those that don’t go to Knossos go to the museum. It can fill up quickly after mid-morning. On the way out of the museum take a little time and hang out in the museum atrium. The light breeze from the hilltop and the shade of the trees is refreshing.

The Historical Museum of Crete.

Iconography. History of Crete Museum. Brownell. 2019

One of several wonderful pieces of iconography on display at the little museum. 2019

A block or so from the waterfront you’ll find a small unassuming building that looks more like someone’s house than a museum. With a boutique gift shop area and ticket counter inside the front door, the museum turns into a multilevel story of Heraklion’s past years. A series of close hallways and tight stairways guide you up three stories. The collection is small, but also eclectic, and worth the time it will take to navigate the building.

A consideration on how to spend your time.

Old fort, Heraklion, Crete. Brownell. 2019

The author exploring the fortress at the old harbor in Heraklion, Crete. 2019

As with any touristy adventure, how you spend your time was probably considered in advance. Time can be a limited commodity for a great many people, and sites need to be seen.

I always find it better to not do this! Being an itinerary-driving traveler does an injustice to most of the places you go. I like to plan little, and wander a great deal. All of Greece is excellent for my type of tourism. There is so much to see and experience that isn’t included in any of the guidebooks. Wandering side streets and lingering in street side bars adds as much to a satisfying experience as staring at statues in museums does. That’s strictly my opinion (obviously), but I find most stories that people have about travel after returning home, don’t involve standing in crowds at a museum. Just slow down and chill a little bit. You’ll like the experience it provides.

Thoughts.

Great weather, great people, and a deep historical culture to explore, Heraklion is definitely worth the time and effort it takes to get there.

I had an excellent time just hanging out, without an agenda. Drinking a little beer and eating gyros. Hahahahaha

It really is a good island, and it lived up to all the pre-travel hype. I suggest you go!

Now get out there, after the Corona virus leaves us alone, go explore an island or two!

2 Comments on “The Wonders of Crete.

  1. I stayed in Crete around ten years ago, in Chania, I think. I travelled to Heraklion to see the grave of Nikos Kazantzakis-I’m a reader and go for that sort of thing!

    Like

    • I went specifically for The Palace of Knossos. It was worth the trip, but there was definitely more to the place than that one site. Glad you enjoyed it!

      Liked by 1 person

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