The current situation in world travel.

There is an ever-growing disconnect between what guide books and travel companies are selling and what tourists end up buying. The hardships and harsh realities of our world effect everything, including the wonders of the world at large. Overpopulation and over-tourism have had impacts (both good and bad) on many cultural areas in the world.

The pressure to keep a tourist attractions pristine versus the pressure of the outside world pushing in around them is a hard thing for many countries to content with. If you travel enough, and by travel I mean non-itinerary non-package travel, you can’t help but notice the downward shift in status to many areas in the last several decades. It’s a sad fact of life on a planet with an ever-increasing population.

The way you think it is.

You come up out of the metro, look at your tourist map you acquired from the hotel (or a thousand other places), fix your view uphill at the Parthenon, and start walking. You turn a corner here, and a corner there, and by complete surprise you round another and run into ruins. White columns stand sturdy in the morning sun telling you of a time when Athens was a mighty city-State. You walk briskly down the little street and peer into the gated area, outlining the space that was once Hadrian’s Library. You read the sign, take a few snaps, and sigh.

Ruins in downtown Athens. BROWNELL, May 2019.

Ruins found in downtown Athens. May 2019.

The way it is a lot of the time.

You come out of your hotel in the stark light of day (because you got there in the middle of the night, having taken the cheapest flight you could get) and are greeted by a rundown, graffiti covered alleyway that leads to the Main Street. You push on, swearing softly to yourself that you need to start making better hotel choices, and realize that this street isn’t just the local paint spot. You turn the corner and the breakdown of society continues on, completely robbing the next street of any value. You bust out of of this gauntlet of urban decay, hoping to find the central square by the metro in better states. When you reach the Main Street, the traffic is so congested that you just walk between the car. The locals give you that annoyed tourist look, but you kind of don’t care at this point, because the touts in the square have already seen you and are ready to try and sell you bunches of crap you don’t want. You sigh, realizing you only have three more days of this, and keep trudging toward the graffiti-covered sign arrowing your way toward the Parthenon.

A side street in Athens, Greece. BROWNELL, May 2019

A random street in Athens, Greece. May, 2019.

The idea behind over-tourism.

The idea of over-tourism has been around for a considerable amount of time. Places like Athens, Rome, and Venice have long been complaining about the problems that it brings with it.

To be honest, I don’t think that there’s a fix for it. With ever-increasing populations of people that have the ability and the means to go abroad the situation can really do nothing but get worse. What one can do is adjust to new realities.

The first suggestion is about timing. I mentioned it a couple times in the last post about being at the venue before it opened to get in without crowds. The majority of the tourists these days travel in an organized group; bus trips, cruise ships adventures, day tour groups, and the like. These groups have almost universally predictable schedules. They appear between 9-10 in the morning, and retire about 4 in the afternoon. Working on either side of this time block will help the single or couples traveling independently to have a better experience.

Second suggestion is also about timing. I tend to travel on the shoulder season. This is especially true in Western Europe, as it reduces prices considerably. The mass of the population travels during warm season or cold season (beach or ski season). There are sometimes limited hours or limited options in lodging during the shoulder season, but the lack of crowds more than makes up for that. I’m completely convinced of this.

Below are two pictures to sumerize what a difference 2 hours can make at a major attraction. (While in Madrid, I planned wrong and literally left because of the huge lines at the Palace. I returned the next day and had a very nice experience.)

Steps up to the Parthenon at the opening of the day. BROWNELL, May 2019

The steps to the Parthenon just after the 8:00 opening. May, 2019

Steps up to the Parthenon a couple hours after opening. BROWNELL, May 2019.

The steps up to the Parthenon, a couple hours after opening. The crowds did not get less from this point on. May 2019

Things you were told never to do that are now perfectly acceptable.

There is an axiom that I learned many years ago. You never discuss politics or religion while drinking. Truer words have never been spoken. Well, up until a couple years ago, anyway.With the over-population of the tourist world, and the advent of global media, some of the rules have loosened. I’ve had some fabulous political conversations in bars, religious conversations in churches, and tourist conversation with taxi drivers. People in other places aren’t immune to the global situation, and can be genuinely curious about the reality of situations in other parts of the world (as opposed to the distorted views presented by the media).

My suggestion, just go into these conversations gently and honestly. You’ll find them extremely rewarding. (I had a fantastic conversation about Geopolitics with the guy at the front desk of my hotel. It was fact based and timely. He had come to Athens from one of the islands, and had insights that I wasn’t going to hear on any tv network.)

Thoughts.

Okay, I realize that sections of this were an over-dramatization of the realities of life. I also realize that I’ve kind of been picking on Athens, and not spreading the joy around Europe. Most European cities have these problems, to one degree or another. Not only Europe, but north and South America as well.

There’s no real fix for the issues that present themselves, other than limiting the amount of tourism (which some cities and countries are already looking at) or cutting the global population back down to realistic numbers (which probably isn’t going to happen). The days of undiscovered ruins and un-crowded archeological sites are a thing of the past. My best advice is to study the place you want to go, and go when it seems that other people aren’t going. Off-peak traveling, and end of day museums stops may help you have a better travel experience.

*****To be fair*****

I have to say that I loved Athens. Once I looked past all the graffiti and people doing drugs in alleyways, there was a host of things to do and experiences to be had. The food and beer scene was excellent. Their ruins and museums are well-kept, and world-class. And the people, once you stop to talk with them, are warm and engaging. Try and look part the problems, and see the true essence of a place. It will help you have a better time. Just sayin…..

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